why this can not go in ether of my rubbish bins

I can not put these in my black bin or Green bin

black_bin_cartoon_1index

  • Plastic Bags – please place all items loose in your black bin
  • Polystyrene
  • Tissues and Kitchen Roll
  • Textiles (eg. clothes and bedding)
  • Crisp packets, food wrappers
  • Light bulbs
  • Mirrors
  • Window Panes
  • Plant pots
  • Composite foil and laminate pouches such as those used for pet food

Now i would of thought by now someone would of come up with a way of recycling

the likes of the bread plastic you buy your bread in sausages bag that you get in the freezer

So how are we meant to recycle them any ideas warmly welcome

 

 

Worms convert dog poop into plant food.

 

 

 

 

dogpoopscoopedup

 

Dealing with dog poop is probably one of the things every dog owner dreads! There are indeed millions

of nicer topics to talk about than dog waste or dog shit (sorry for using that word but it is what it is)!

But lets face it every proud owner of a German Shepherd, Jack Russel, Husky or any other breed will have to make a plan to get rid of his or her best friends waste.

After all dog feces can be annoying, smelly and even the cause of disease. There are a lot of bacteria in dog waste including E. coli, and salmonella.

Probably the most common way to deal with dog waste is to send the children into the garden or backyard on a regular basis to scoop up the smelly piles and throw them into the rubbish bin.

This way we get rid of the problem in our backyard but the animal waste would still be dumped on the municipal landfill sites and pose a threat to the communal health.

A much better way to deal with dog waste is to use earthworms or better composting worms to convert the dog shit into nutrient rich worm castings.

Dog shit, is in an excellent food source for earthworms. Worms don’t have teeth and can only feed on soft decomposing materials.

 

Dogpoopdaddedtobin

We have a worm bin or as I call it a “Pet poop com-poster” in the backyard that has been running

exclusively on dog poop for close to 9 years now.

The worms seem to be happy and their breeding activity in those worm bins is exceptional.

Some of the benefits of using compost worms to recycle your dog poop are:

———-

  • No bad odors in the back yard or garden (healthy worm bins never smell)
  • ·Reduction of waste rotting on landfill sites
  • ·Constant production of worms that will recycle organic wastewormcocoonsbulkMore than 20 worm cocoons on a tiny space in a dog waste worm bin
  • Production of worm castings which can be used to fertilize flowers, trees and lawns, but should not be used to feed fruit and vegetables.
  • Constant production of worms that can be sold for extra income
  • Constant supply of fat worms for freshwater fishing

Ants in the heap

QUESTION

my compost bins I have some fruit flies, and concluded that they are not a problem. However, I also get large quantities of ants. Are these harmful in compost? And, if they are is there a way to deal with them that won’t harm the beneficial insects. I also have woodlice, but assume that they are as harmless as they look.

 

Answer …

As you quite rightly say fruit flies are harmless and are not causing any harm However, you can reduce their numbers by burying the fresh waste when you add it to your bin as well as covering the top of the compost with a damp newspaper or cardboard. This will help to reduce access to the fruit that they feed on. Ants have a beneficial role in the composting process, playing a part in the recycling of animal and plant remains. There is no need to get rid of them, or the woodlice. Both are important in helping to recycle waste material.

However, the presence of the ants may indicate that your compost is on the dry side. Try turning the compost and giving it a good soaking with water.

Citrus waste

 

Question …

We often make fresh orange juice for breakfast and regularly produce several skins as waste. We have been avoiding putting any citrus peel on our compost heap having heard the “experts” saying don’t. What is your advice?

Answer …

Large quantities of citrus in a compost or worm bin can make the contents excessively acidic. Only add a little citrus peel at a time and mix with other waste. To help the peel break down, cut it up into small pieces. Addition of a handful of ground limestone will help to re-dress the balance if you add too much peel and composting has slowed down. If you are producing a large volume of peel you may wish to dispose of it in another way. You could take it to your local green waste dump where it would be composted with a larger volume of materials.

I would also put it though a mixer first

Slap-Chop-Food-Chopper-Machine-Vegetable-Fruit-Cutter-Kitchen-Helper

 

You should do this will all your kitchen waste were possible

As the worms  and other insect have small mouths that help to break down our compost

 

Composting paper

 

Question …

We have recently acquired a document shredder to safely dispose of unwanted documents, documents, bank statements, junk mail etc. We would very much like to incorporate the shredding into out compost, but are concerned about the possible effects of printing inks. Please could you advise?

Answer …

Adding paper to your compost heap is fine. The inks that are used in modern printing are mostly vegetable based, non-toxic and not damaging to the environment. If you do not produce a lot of woody waste then paper is a good alternative as it provides the fiber, necessary to make good compost. Ensure that you do not add too much shredded paper all at once and mix it well with other waste.

and water each layer unless you chop both your greens and browns together with Rain water not Tap water please and thank you

 

 

 

My two day master composting workshop

Day one

After coffee and signing in and the introductions

we had a little talk about the partnership between Garden Organic and the Master composting  network

then we had a site visit

 

http://greenworldsales.co.uk/composting.asp

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gardenorganic/with/26489905431/

 

I had taken some lovely photos but  my PC swallowed them up can not find them anywhere on my computer

so the only one  could find was this one

PTDC0014

stays in these baggy things for 12 weeks before being bags up for compost      for the general public

it is an amazing place

this like the one we went to look at with the steaming piles

could not find one similar to the site we went to I  keep looking for one

well here are my photos form the 2nd day

I just can not wait to start my 30 hours before I am giving my  CERTIFICATE